Category: Urban Transportation

Genre de Vie: The Moment You Would Start Pedaling

The concept of ‘genre de vie’ (way of life) was introduced by geographer Paul Vidal de la Blanche in the beginning of the 20th century. The philosophy is about the belief that the lifestyle of a particular region reflects the economic, social, ideological and psychological identities imprinted on the landscape.

 

“In the past few years a growing number of cities worldwide have been (re)discovering the use of the bicycle. Sustainability plays a large role in the motivation behind the revival of the bicycle and takes on different challenges, placing itself in a new and relevant social position. The question then remains whether or not the revitalization and new positioning of the bicycle could contribute to the livability of society.

The documentary Genre De Vie researches the present effects of this form of transport and the lifestyle that is attached to it though research into already existing initiatives that play a crucial role in the revitalization of the bicycle. By taking a global perspective the documentary makers form a clear view on the transformation of cities and urban living. Concentrating also on the effects of the bicycle from a socio-cultural standing point within the individual is central.” – Vimeo

 

Photo credit: StadtRAD Hamburg

People-oriented approach to a walkable and bikeable Jakarta

by Arlene Nathania   Fighting against Jakarta’s traffic during peak hours burns us out, and burns our money — for nothing. At some point, driving a car starts to be a symbol of immobility rather than mobility. There have been different approaches introduced to deal with Jakarta’s widespread urban congestion, namely the Transjakarta busway, mass rapid transit (MRT) and monorail systems, electronic… Read more →

Walkers are ‘practitioners of the city,’ for the city is made to be walked. A city is a language, a repository of possibilities, and walking is the act of speaking that language, of selecting from those possibilities. Just as language limits what can be said, architecture limits where one can walk, but the walker invents other ways to go.

Rebecca Solnit – Wanderlust, A History of Walking.