Author: leneurbanity

Hardy’s Bamboo Houses in Bali: Building Homes with Sustainable Materials

“Bamboos will do good if you use them right.” says Hardy. Revisiting the utilization of bamboo, the most traditional and indigenous material in Indonesia, Hardy has proved that comfort, luxury, and beauty can be manifested and replicated sustainably.

You’ve never seen buildings like this. The stunning bamboo homes built by Elora Hardy and her team in Bali twist, curve and surprise at every turn. They defy convention because the bamboo itself is so enigmatic. No two poles of bamboo are alike, so every home, bridge and bathroom is exquisitely unique. In this beautiful, immersive talk, she shares the potential of bamboo, as both a sustainable resource and a spark for the imagination. “We have had to invent our own rules,” she says.

-Ted Talks 2015

Further references: Ibuku

 

 

Photo credit: Arlene Nathania

Elbtreppen: Zaha Hadid’s New Elbe Promenade in Hamburg

  Elbtreppen is a recently accomplished riverbank project by Zaha Hadid Architects that spans along the Niederhafen Port at River Elbe, the river that divides Hamburg into roughly two equal regions, located between Landungsbrücken and Speicherstadt (Baumwall), two of the oldest urban spots and tourist magnets of this port city.     “The Niederhafen was once a significant commercial port in… Read more →

Image source: Barcelona Navigator

Co-working and Co-living: 6 Unique and Sustainable Work Environments

Along with the growth of creative industry, co-working concept arises and proliferates in the recent years as a new kind of modern working place. “Co-working is a style of work that involves a shared working environment, often an office, and independent activity. Unlike in a typical office environment, those co-working are usually not employed by the same organization.” (Carsten, 2011). You… Read more →

Water Sensitive Urban Design: A Reconciliation Between Water and Cities

By creating ‘water sensitive cities’ it is possible to address the major challenges of water shortage, flooding and pollution. This film, commissioned by the Landscape Institute and based on work by CIRIA, Arup and AECOM, explains the concept of Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) and argues the case for designing ‘with’ water when planning any new development.

WSUD is an integrated solution to flooding, droughts and water quality, which promotes a more rational and frugal use of water alongside the creation of beautiful and resilient places. WSUD is about looking beyond the idea that a pipe in the ground is the best option for dealing with rain water — it is about prioritising all elements of the water cycle when designing and developing new places. WSUD reduces flooding, harnesses the potential of flood water, cuts the demand for potable water and improves water quality — all measures which make the water supply chain more sustainable.

Landscape Institute UK (Find out more about the Landscape Institute’s work on water via this link). 

Pastures Along the Rhine, Düsseldorf

City Grazing: The Embryo of Sustainable Living

There was a joke saying that ambiance in a well-done developed city is actually similar to living in a countryside, but with different affluence. It won’t be too sophisticated and high-tech like Tokyo, too commercialized like New York, as fashionable as Paris, vastly expanding like Shanghai, or having 24/7 hustle bustle economy like Hong Kong and Singapore. It will be far from… Read more →

Photo source: Windows Central

Tired of Manual Scanning? Microsoft Office Lens: Utterly Handy for Designers

As a designer, either you are doing architecture and urban design, graphic design, fashion design, or else, you would be quite familiar with this task: manual scanning. Conventionally, you usually depend on scanners to capture visual graphics and images that you have, whether after drawing a new sketch or diagram, curating a printed information that you would like to compile for your new… Read more →